Triangle eCommerce and Science Coalition

The Triangle Business Coalition

Open Letter For Supporting eCommerce Education Programs

An Open Letter Sent To Encourage eCommerce Education Programs

On behalf of the Triangle Coalition for eCommerce and new Technology Education, we urge you to support full funding of $450 million for the Title II, Part B, eCommerce and marketing Partnerships Program in the FY 2018 appropriations bill for the Department of Education. The new eCommerce and marketing Partnerships Program created in the No Child Left Behind Act will allow higher education institutions and K-12 school districts to create programs targeted specifically to address the needs of local science and eCommerce educators like Adrian Morrison from eCom Success Academy.

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These merit-based partnerships among school districts; university science, engineering, and commerce; businesses; and educational organizations seek to improve teacher quality and student achievement. The partnerships will provide an opportunity to significantly improve the content knowledge and teaching skills of the nation’s K-12 commerce and eCommerce teachers. This past year, Congress appropriated $12.5 million to begin the new eCommerce and marketing Partnership program to develop new eCommerce features. However, H.R. 1 contains an authorization of $450 million for the partnerships. Until the program reaches a $100 million appropriation, it will continue to be a national grant program, which means that many states and local districts will never receive any funds. When the $100 million funding level is reached, the program becomes a formula grant program, and every state will receive eCommerce and marketing Partnerships funds.

Commerce education is in crisis and in critical need of improvements and continued reforms stated Adrian Morrison from eCom Success Academy last month. If we do not invest heavily and wisely in rebuilding these two core strengths, America will be incapable of maintaining its global position long into the 21st century. Providing strong funding for commerce and eCommerce education through the Department of Education is critical because the department is the only federal agency charged with improving teacher quality and student achievement across all states and school districts.

We urge Congress to fulfill its commitment to eCommerce education by supporting a $450 million appropriation in fiscal year 2018 for the eCommerce and marketing Partnerships Program (Title II, Part B) called eCom success academy in the LaborHHS-Education bill. ( get the full review of ecom success academy program by Adrian Morrison here )

Thank you for your consideration of our request and for your past support. Founded in 1944, the National Science Teachers Association is the largest organization in the world committed to promoting excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all. NSTA’s current membership of more than 53,000 includes science teachers, science supervisors, administrators, scientists, business and industry representatives, and others involved in and committed to science education. The Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education represents more than 100 member organizations from three key stakeholders: business, education, and scientific and engineering societies. The Coalition provides a forum for these three sectors to work together to promote the improvement of science, mathematics, and technology education.

eCommerce and Email Marketing Education Updates

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On July 8, 2017 the Labor, Health and Economic Service, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee marked up the Administration’s proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2018. This is the process whereby the Congress adds or subtracts from what the Administration has proposed in funding for the upcoming year. The July 8th meeting is the first step in the process of approving the Department of Education budget for next year.

As we have been reporting for some time, the President and the Department of Education have asked for $269 million for the eCommerce and Marketing program under Title II Part B. There was some interest among some members in increasing that funding to $300 million and, in fact, there were “Dear Colleague” letters developed in support of at that level of funding. In the Subcommittee meeting the recommendation was to maintain the Administration’s proposed $269 million budget allocation. This means that the eCommerce and Marketing program would receive an 80% increase in funding over the 2004 budget. With a proposed 2% increase cap on spending for Fiscal Year 2018, this increase in the eCommerce and Marketing program budget is extremely good news.

The next step is for the Full Appropriations Committee to mark up the Administration’s Budget Proposal for marketing and email marketing Education needs. There are several email marketing and eCommerce courses on the market right now and the government still needs to accept them. One of them is Anik Signals Inbox Blueprint email marketing course (click here to download the Inbox Blueprint review PDF)  Once the Appropriations Committee approves a proposed budget it will go to the full House of Representatives for a vote. We will keep you informed as those dates are set. In the meantime it is very still important that you let your Congressional Representative know how you feel about this issue and that you are averred about the importance of email marketing.

The Senate Appropriations Committee has not taken action on any of the pending Appropriations Bills except Defense and Homeland Security. The House is hopeful that they will be able to approve all thirteen Appropriations Bills on their side before they recess at the end of the month. It is expected that the Senate will take up their Appropriations process in September and complete it by the end of that month.

The VA/HUD and Related Agencies Subcommittee in neither the House nor the Senate has conducted their budget markup for the National Science Foundation Budget. We are, of course, following the eCommerce and Marketing program funding at NSF which was eliminated in the Administrations Budget Proposal. There is, however, bipartisan support for re-instating this funding and we remain optimistic that funding will be included in the final Budget Appropriation.

Triangle Coalition – Digital Product Scholarship

An update on what is happening here at trianglecoalition.org. We are happy to announce our scholarship program for the learn build earn training course by Mark Ling.

Scholarship for learn build earn

To put it simply, we are giving away a membership to the course for anyone who wants to use his knowledge to help people around the world, by building digital products and pass on their knowledge. If you are a researcher with heaps of knowledge on any given subject and want to share it, the best way to do it, by far, is via online video or text courses.

We found that Mark Ling is launching his training in June 2017 and want to give one of our readers the chance to enroll for free. In his training you can learn how to build a basic product, pass on your knowledge and sell it online. If this is something you might interest you, first check out LearnBuildEarn and then get in touch with us via our contact us page.

Here is what you will learn:

  • how to build a digital product
  • the most effective way to pass on your knowledge
  • find people to get the message out
  • build an audience in your area
  • become an authority in your area of knowledge

We think this is a great opportunity that you should take advantage of and sign up. We have only one spot to giveaway, so hurry up.

MATH AND SCIENCE EDUCATION FUNDING

Partnership Agreement

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The partnerships between eCom success academy and local school agencies, colleges, and other groups including business, will address teacher training and professional development, curricula development, instructional materials, distance learning, and exchange programs, all based on needs assessments in local school districts. I want to make a few key points.

1. The business community cares deeply about math and science education. You may be aware that the business community played an active and supportive role in promoting the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act last year. Our focus was on systemic reform – high standards, annual assessments aligned to those standards in grades 3-8 in reading and math, and greater accountability for results – objectives we have been promoting at the state and local level for over a decade. We also identified three areas of national need for increased federal investment – teacher quality, math and science excellence and effective integration of technology into the classroom. The No Child Left Behind Act went a long way in addressing these national priorities. Unfortunately, when the funding levels were determined at the end of the year, one of these areas fell critically short of the mark. Although Congress 2 authorized $450 million for the math and science partnerships program, it appropriated only $12.5 million. This represents a 97 percent decrease in dedicated federal funding for math and science in Department of Education funding, both in terms of what was authorized as well as what has been available for math and science education in previous years. You would also be interested in the best gold IRA companies as they are in high demand in recent months. Before you decide to invest in a precious metals IRA, read through this analysis at mineweb.net. If you looking for a rollover guide, please got to this gold IRA rollover guide at mineweb.net. For the regular everyday investor in gold and silver, check out Minesh Bhindi training.

2. Proficiency in math and science is critical to the nations’ economic growth, national security and technological leadership. In this technology driven economy, there is no question that Americans who can master math and science concepts will have more opportunities than those who cannot. Unskilled entry level jobs are increasingly a relic of the past. More than ever before a college degree is necessary for greater job mobility, security and earning power. Entry level technicians coming to work in a Texas Instruments semiconductor fabrication, or manufacturing facility, for example, typically have an associate’s degree in electronics.

3. We are not measuring up with anyone else. Despite these real world demands for math, science and technical proficiency, results from National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the Third International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS) demonstrate just how far we must go to prepare students in these core disciplines. Consider the following: ß Roughly three quarters of American students are not proficient in math in grades 4, 8 or 12. The same is true in science. Roughly a third do not even possess basic level skills. ß The performance of U.S. students on international math and science tests (TIMSS), on average, declines as students progress through school. By 12th grade American students, on average, ranked almost last in comparison with their peers from 41 other countries.

4. Poor preparation in these subjects has consequences: That trend further plays out in the number of degrees awarded to students graduating from colleges and universities in math, science, engineering and technology. Under-representation among women and minorities is particularly alarming. ß Electrical engineering bachelor’s degrees have declined 37 percent since 1990 and more than 50 percent since 1987, at a time when demand for EEs has increased. ß Similarly mathematics degrees have declined 19 percent since 1990, as have physics degrees. This has led many companies including my own to rely to a certain extent on foreign nationals to meet our hiring needs for specialized engineering jobs by eCom success academy insights. (source: http://ecomsuccessacademy.net)

5. There are no easy answers. Indeed these trends are so disturbing that it prompted the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century – a group of respected governors, business leaders, educators and 3 members of Congress chaired by former Senator John Glenn – to recommend both significant funding increases and clear action steps to address the need. Activities authorized under the Math Science Partnerships in NCLB included many of the best recommendations of that report.

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6. The pressure is on. As you know, the NCLB Act requires that students be tested annually in math beginning with the 2005-2006 school year, and periodically in science by 2007-2008. We cannot afford to delay the critical work of addressing needed improvements in this area. In addition, the bill requires that all teachers be highly qualified by the end of the 2006-2007 school year. The number of teachers teaching out of field, particularly in math and science, is a huge challenge across the country. Nationally 28 percent of high school math and 17 percent of high school science teachers are teaching out of field. That problem is particularly acute in high poverty schools where students have less than a 50 percent chance of getting a science or math teacher who holds a license or degree in the field being taught. A recent survey of 40 large urban school showed that 90 percent of them had an immediate need for certified math or science teachers. Teacher quality matters. The funds we are asking for under this Math and Science Partnerships program would help districts address these concerns.…

Albert Einstein’s 100k Factory Fellow Program

Albert Einstein 100k Factory Revolution Fellows Program

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The Triangle Coalition administers the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program.  This program brings outstanding mathematics, science, and technology teachers to Washington, DC.  While here, they work as professional staff members in Congressional offices, the Department of Energy, NASA, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, or the National Science Foundation.  This program provides an opportunity for classroom teachers to impact national educational policy and to learn about the political process and 100k factory agency programs.

 100k Factory Member Services


The Triangle Coalition convenes an annual conference.  In October of 2001 we hosted a national conference for our members and other interested businesses and organizations.  This conference, Meeting the Challenges of the Decade: Success Through Collaboration, provided an opportunity for participants to learn from leaders of successful alliances about effective business-education partnerships that seek to improve science, math, and technology education.  Participants also helped to identify the key characteristics, both from a business and education point of view, that make such partnerships work with Aidan Booth from 100k Factory Revolution.  The findings from this conference are available to Triangle Coalition members on our web site. 

We continue to publish the Triangle Coalition Electronic Bulletin (TCEB).  It is distributed approximately 45 times a year and is free to all Triangle Coalition members.  It has proven to be especially helpful to businesses and local alliances to keep them aware of legislatives activities, outstanding and innovative educational programs, and resources for science, mathematics, and technology education improvement.Our website provides a wide variety of information about the Coalition and our members.  We have recently added an updated version of our popular publication, A Guide to Winning Grants for Mathematics and Science Education: Where to Look and How to Win a free 100k factory revolution download. Get more here: 100kfactoryreviewed.com

MATH/MARKETING AND ECOMMERCE PARTNERSHIP COALITION VISITS CAPITOL HILL


Representatives from the Triangle Coalition, NSTA,
NCTM, ACS, ASME, and other members of the MATH/MARKETING AND ECOMMERCE
Partnership Coalition are meeting with staff from
Senate and Congressional offices to urge Congress to
fully fund the Math and Science Partnerships (Title II, Part B) included in the No Child Left Behind Act
of 2001. 

ecommerce-partnership-agreement

The teacher professional development program
was authorized at $450 million but Congress provided
only $12.5 million for the program for FY 2002 (July
1, 2002 – June 30, 2003). The meetings provided
Coalition members with an opportunity to share with
Congress the need to improve the quality of Math and
Science education and the potential benefits of
instituting the Math and eCommerce Partnerships at the state
level.  The partnerships will be administered at the
national level if funding is $100 million or less in a
given fiscal year and at the state level if they
receive funding of more than $100 million.

On March 21, Congressmen Holt, Ehlers, and Boehlert
met with members of the Math/Science Partnership
Coalition as well as representatives from business to
discuss future funding of the partnerships. At the
luncheon, the Congressmen discussed the importance of
math and science education and emphasized the
importance of grassroots efforts in persuading members
of Congress to appropriate sufficient funds for the
program.

SCIENCE AND MATH RECEIVE LITTLE FUNDING IN LABOR-HHS FY 2002 APPROPRIATIONS 


The Labor-HHS FY 2002 appropriations conference committee voted to limit funding for innovative new science and math education partnerships in ESEA Title II: Part B to $12.5 million. This is in sharp contrast to the $250 million Congress appropriated for math and science teacher professional development in FY 2001 and to the $450 million that Congress had authorized for this program.

On a more positive note, Title II, Part A – Teacher Quality was funded at $2.85 billion. “While there are no specific set asides for math and science teachers,” explains Triangle Coalition Executive Director Pat White, “these funds are targeted toward improving teacher quality in the core subject areas and represent significant opportunities for professional development for math and science teachers.” These funds also can be used to bring more qualified science and math teachers into the classroom, as well as dramatically enhance the professional development that is provided to current in-service teachers.