Anthony Artuso

Director, Product Management for STEM

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Tony Artuso has 20+ years of experience in developing, managing, and marketing STEM educational material. Currently Director of STEM for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH), Tony is a graduate of the University of California and holds an MBA from Harvard Business School.

His background spans the key stakeholders in the field of STEM. First, he has worked on educational projects across the disciplines of mathematics, science, technology, and engineering. Science curricula that he has managed include two NSF-funded curricula:  FOSS (Full Option Science System), the #1 inquiry-based science curriculum (in terms of market share), and Insights. On the math side, Tony brokered deals that have resulted in the widespread dissemination of standards-based curricula across K-12, including Think Math!, a K-6 curriculum published by School Specialty, Impact Mathematics, a middle school curriculum published by McGraw-Hill and adopted in NYC, and CME Math, a high school curriculum published by Pearson. In terms of engineering, he arranged for publication of the Young Scientist series, a pre-K engineering curriculum, through Redleaf Press, and ensured funding for Education Development Center (EDC) to create new units in SAE’s K-12 series of design challenges, A World in Motion (AWIM).Technology-oriented curricula he has worked on include Microbe Detectives, a series of high school biotech modules, and the Head First series, IT training for the college and trade market.

He has worked with both STEM content developers, such as EDC and Lawrence Hall of Science, and STEM content distributors, including Delta Education, O’Reilly Media, and HMH. Finally, he has worked for both for-profits, including technology start-ups, and non-profits, including EDC and Harvard University. With his depth of experience in creating, nurturing, and maintaining strategic partnerships, he hopes to strengthen the close working relationships the Triangle Coalition has formed over the years across key STEM constituents.